Square Design Series

Our inverter-chargers are low-frequency, transformer-based systems designed to power ample loads over an extended period of time. They feature a non-corrosive exterior cabinet, internal ventilation fans to dispense heat, heavy duty fittings and plastic assembly, a GFCI outlet and a terminal block to hard wire AC input and output. A programmed algorhythm monitors the four-stage battery charger from bulk charge to trickle.

Our inverters are available in 50 or 60 hertz, 120/240  Vac, and available in 12, 24, and 48 VDC.

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1500W Pure Sine Inverter-Charger

Square Design Series
Model Number: UP12/1500SD

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2000W Pure Sine Inverter-Charger

Square Design Series
Model Number: UP12/2000SD

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2500W Pure Sine Inverter-Charger

Square Design Series
Model Number: UP12/2500SD

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3000W Pure Sine Inverter-Charger

Square Design Series
Model Number: UP12/3000SD

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4000W Pure Sine Inverter-Charger

Square Design Series
Model Number: UP12/4000SD

More Information On Our Inverter-Chargers

Power inverters come in three types: pure, modified and quasi-sine wave forms. A power inverter converts DC to AC power by use of transformers, circuit boards and an electronic oscillator that produces an electronic signal. A pure sine wave inverter has equipment that produces the cleanest, smoothest signal at 50 or 60 hertz. Pure sine wave inverters are generally more expensive than modified or quasi-sine inverters because their signals or squarer, or rougher, more of a step wave than a smooth, oscillating wave. Pure sine wave inverters align with the signals produced by all equipment currently on the market.

Microwaves, some computers, and equipment using variable speed motors, may not produce full output or run efficiently if they do not run with a pure sine wave inverter. Certain lighting, digital clocks and electric timers may also not work properly. Appliances controlling temperature may also be at risk and often you may hear a “buzz” in the line due to the rougher waves caused by harmonic distortion output.

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